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The Bellarine Peninsula

The Bellarine  is largely rural with growing coastal townships. Approximately 5% of pre-European indigenous vegetation remains in the region with the majority of vegetation communities classified as endangered, vulnerable or threatened. The Peninsula’s hills, remnant woodlands, coastal foreshores, rural, residential and industrial areas are intrinsically linked to the surrounding wetlands or marine environments. Many land management activities adversely affect Reedy Lake, Lake Connewarre, and Swan Bay via these catchment links. Increasing population shifts to coastal townships on the Bellarine Peninsula put further strain on already fragile and fragmented coastal and wetland habitats. The effect of climate change on our catchment, coastal and marine habitats is of importance to the Bellarine Catchment Network.

Bellarine Catchment Network

The Bellarine Catchment Network (BCN) comprises representatives from key catchment and coastal organisations (both government and non-government) with a integrated catchment management focus. This includes environment groups, 'Friends Of', Landmanagers, Landcare and Coastcare. BCN employees two officers to implement the projects of the committee.

A designated representative from each of the organisations is appointed by the individual organisations to the BCN.

In 2008 a ten year review of the project was held and a new action plan ,The Bellarine Catchment Network Action Plan 2009 - 2014, was developed. At this time the Swan Bay Integrated Catchment Management Committee changed its name to the Bellarine Catchment Network (BCN) to better reflect the area that the project now covers.

Currently a new Action Plan is being developed. An update and link will be added to the website in 2016

Vision

The Bellarine Catchment Network region will work towards healthy, well connected and resilient wetlands, waterways and native vegetation ecosystems; sustainable agricultural and land management practices; and a community which is engaged and involved in protecting and managing the natural environment. 

Priority Aims

  1. Protect and enhance Ramsar wetlands and connecting wetlands
  2. Promote and apply Ramsar values and guidelines
  3. Protect, enhance and link remnant vegetation
  4. Protect indigenous fauna and enhance existing habitats
  5. Facilitate community awareness and participation
  6. Advocate for adaptive management to climate change
  7. Rehabilitate and protect watercourses and improve water quality (in-stream & stormwater)
  8. Increase the adoption of sustainable agricultural and land management practices
  9. Promote pest plant and pest animal control
  10. Be an active, engaged and well-supported network

Current Groups and Organisations

The Bellarine Catchment Network (BCN) comprises representatives from key catchment and coastal organisations (both government and non-government) with a landcare / coastcare focus, as well as two project coordinators. A designated representative from each of the organisations is appointed by the individual organisations to the BCN.

The Bellarine Catchment NetworkThe groups include:

  • Barwon Coast Committee of Management
  • Bellarine Bayside Foreshore Committee of Management
  • Bellarine Landcare Group
  • Borough of Queenscliffe
  • City of Greater Geelong
  • Clifton Springs / Curlewis Coastcare Group
  • Conservation Volunteers Australia
  • Drysdale / Clifton Springs Community Association
  • Friends of Begola Wetland
  • Friends of the Bellarine Rail Trail
  • Friends of Buckley Park
  • Friends of Edwards Point
  • Friends of Hooded Plover Bellarine
  • Friends of Ocean Grove Nature Reserve
  • Friends of Point Richards
  • Global Warming Group Queenscliffe
  • Greening Australia Victoria
  • Ocean Grove Coastcare Group
  • Orange Bellied Parrot Working Group - Bellarine
  • Parks Victoria
  • Swan Bay Environment Association